2019 WOA/WIAA Certified Official Requirements

Test/Clinic
The clinics, test and background check are now available on ArbiterSports for all WOA registered officials.  You must complete all the “2018-19 Certified Softball” requirements – the WOA Clinic, WOA-NASO Clinic, the Softball Clinic, Concussion Management (if due), the Background-Check-Consent and the Softball test. 

When you log into ArbiterSports and go to the Central Hub, right below the “Home” tab you can click on “Eligibility Center” and that will take you to the page indicating the requirements you must fulfill for the “2018-19 Certified Softball” – 6 requirements.  

Here is the link to the study guide for the softball test: 

https://woasoftball.arbitersports.com/Groups/108551/Library/files/2019WOASoftballStudyGuide.pdf

All requirements MUST be met before you are able to work any high school assignments.

Do You Have What It Takes

To Umpire the BEST?

Take 3 Steps!

take 3 steps

It’s a simple challenge: TAKE THREE STEPS into the infield when you are working behind the plate. PERIOD.  Umpires – this isn’t hard, but too many of us aren’t doing it – and our customers are noticing.
 
The number one gripe I hear from every league is:
 
“The umpires NEVER move out from behind home plate.”
 
Umpires: We need to change this. So here is your challenge: TAKE THREE STEPS. Take at least three steps INTO THE INFIELD to make calls at first, second and third base.
 
SLOW PITCH and JV HIGH SCHOOL UMPIRES  – you are working 1-umpire mechanics. You have to make calls at ALL THE BASES. The absolute WORST place to make a call at 1st, 2nd, or 3rd base is behind home plate. It’s BAD, NO GOOD, DON’T EVER STAND THERE (unless there is a runner at third coming home).
 
This is serious business. Getting out from behind home plate should be standard procedure for all umpires so I’ve developed a plan to help us all remember how to do this.

Umpires, Your UIC is full of warm fuzzy “thank yous” to give out. She’s happiest when she’s bragging about how absolutely wonderful you are and how she had absolutely NOTHING to do with it.

But she also cares enough about the leagues we serve and the quality of umpires we put out there to make a serious commitment to quality when it’s needed. It’s needed now. Please.TAKE THREE STEPS into the infield to make your calls.

Kayleen Dunson
Seattle ASA Umpire In Chief

Are You Checking Bats?

We all should be checking to make sure bats are legal before each game we do.

All bats should have the ASA approved certification mark for 2000 or 2004 and be free of burrs, dents, cracks and rattles.

Check out this handy “Quick Guide” on how to inspect bats. The ASA website is the best place to go for more resources. Here’s a link to the one-page color list of bats that HAVE the 2000 or 2004 stamp but have become “Non-Approved.” This is a handy reference guide you should print out and keep with you when you do your games.

Hope this helps to refresh your “bat check skills” and make it easier for all of us to check bats every game.

 

Who decides when it’s safe to play.

Please check the rainout line prior to your game, our assigners will update it as soon as any decisions have been made.

Slow Pitch Leagues

The city parks will decide prior to game time if the fields will be open or closed.  The umpire has the responsibility to determine if the field conditions are safe before and during the game, and can end the game when they feel it is no longer safe to play.  Once a field is deemed unplayable all remaining games on that field are also cancelled.

 

School Games

The home team coach determines if the field conditions are safe before the game starts. Once the game begins that responsibility shifts to the plate umpire. If you re playing a double header, the umpires determine if it is safe to start the second game.

 

College Games

The specified on site administrator determines if the field conditions are safe prior to the start of the game. Once the game begins that responsibility shifts to the plate umpire. If playing a double header, the plate umpire from the first game determines if the field is playable prior to the start of the second game.

 

JO Games

When working tournament games the tournament director determines field conditions to start the tournament and throughout the day. The umpires on individual fields decide during games if their fields are playable.

 

Please make your decisions to continue playing for the safety of the players. If you do call a game please let the assigners know as soon as you can.

 

 

Answers to Uniform Questions

The standard uniform for most of the games we umpire is pretty easy to remember: a powder-blue shirt, black belt, gray pants and black shoes. When you’re doing a plate game you’ll also need a blue or gray ball bag. If it’s cold, you can wear the navy blue jacket.

Here are some common questions about uniforms:

Do I have to wear a t-shirt under my uniform? What color should it be?
You do not have to wear a t-shirt under your uniform. If you do wear a t-shirt, wear white under the powder blue shirt and navy under the navy shirt.

Can I wear the long-sleeve uniform even if my partner is wearing short sleeves?
Yes.

If my partner is wearing a jacket do I have to wear a jacket?
No.

If my partner is wearing a navy blue shirt can I wear my powder blue shirt?
No. You must be dressed in the same color uniform. Powder blue is the default uniform, so if you can’t decide, go with powder.

Can I wear a white t-shirt under my navy blue shirt?
No. You must wear a navy blue t-shirt under the navy blue uniform.

Can I wear my shin guards over my pants?
No. That just looks silly.

Can I umpire in shorts?
Yes you can umpire in shorts – for SLOW PITCH only. Shorts must be navy or heather gray.

Does it matter what color ball bag I wear?
No. You can wear a navy or gray ball bag.

Will I have to buy navy pants?
The standard uniform for SMSUA is gray pants so we will not require you to buy navy. Some umpire organizations use navy pants as the standard uniform and if you travel to those organizations you may need to purchase navy pants.